Graham-Cassidy Proposal Puts Medicaid Coverage at Risk

Senate Republicans continue to push for legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. The Graham-Cassidy bill is sponsored by Senator Lindsey Graham, from South Carolina and Senator Bill Cassidy, from Louisiana. Although the bill is still lacking 50 votes needed, it is important to understand the effects it may have on health care. Continue reading “Graham-Cassidy Proposal Puts Medicaid Coverage at Risk”

Social Security Disability Insurance vs. Supplemental Security Income

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are both supplemental income programs that are used to help the disabled, elderly, and blind. The main difference between SSDI and SSI is that SSI is a means-based program, whereas SSDI is an entitlement program. SSDI is only available to people who have worked long enough to accumulate work credits. SSI is available to people who have not earned enough work credits and can show that they financially need the support. Both SSI and SSDI are administered by the Social Security Administration, but they have entirely different financial requirements. Continue reading “Social Security Disability Insurance vs. Supplemental Security Income”

A Pooled Income Trust May Be The Best Option For Those With Excess Income

For an individual to be eligible for Medicaid services at home, he or she must be over 65 and disabled. In addition, the applicant must meet certain income and asset criteria in order to qualify, because Medicaid eligibility requires a means based test. As of 2017, an applicant is allowed to have $845.00 in income. It is possible that Medicaid may take any income in excess of this amount. For many individuals, turning over these excess funds to Medicaid is not a viable option because it would leave them without the means to pay certain expenses. Continue reading “A Pooled Income Trust May Be The Best Option For Those With Excess Income”

Community Medicaid and Chronic Medicaid

To qualify for Community Medicaid an applicant may have no more than $14,850.00 in assets. Community Medicaid provides coverage for at home care. It does not have a look back period and allows an individual to be eligible for benefits within one month. In addition, the $14,850 does not include qualifying retirement accounts, where the individual is taking monthly required distributions. Continue reading “Community Medicaid and Chronic Medicaid”

Medicaid Financials At A Glimpse

New York Medicaid eligibility

Medicaid is a program that entitles individuals who meet certain income and asset criteria to benefits for Chronic Medicaid or Community Medicaid. Chronic Medicaid is care that is provided in a skilled nursing facility, whereas Community Medicaid is care that is provided in an individual’s home by a home health aide. In 2017, Medicaid applicants may have up to $14,850.00 in resources to qualify for Chronic Medicaid. A Medicaid applicant may also have retirement accounts, such as IRAs, as long as the applicant is taking the minimum monthly distributions. In addition, a pre-paid burial account is an exempt asset. Continue reading “Medicaid Financials At A Glimpse”

New York Medicaid Personal Care Services

NY Medicaid personal care servicesMedicaid is a federal and state funded program that provides health coverage to those, including the elderly and disabled, who meet certain income and resource eligibility requirements. Personal care services (PCS), or home attendant services, are provided by a personal care aide to individuals who require nutritional and environmental support as well as assistance with personal care functions. Through New York Medicaid, eligible individuals can receive PCS to maintain their health and safety in their own homes. Continue reading “New York Medicaid Personal Care Services”

Protect Yourself With Long Term Care Insurance

With changing healthcare and increased longevity, it is important to acquire long term care insurance, because both State and Federal budgets are threatening certain Medicaid benefits. An adequate estate plan should include measures to protect against devastating healthcare costs. One solution is long term care insurance. Continue reading “Protect Yourself With Long Term Care Insurance”

Which Trust Helps Me Qualify for Medicaid?

Through conscious Medicaid planning, New York residents may be able to preserve some of their assets for their children or other heirs while still meeting Medicaid’s income requirements. One means of achieving this is through the establishment of a trust. By placing assets into certain types of trusts an individual can eliminate their countable assets for Medicaid eligibility purposes. However, only certain trusts may be useful in qualifying for Medicaid. Continue reading “Which Trust Helps Me Qualify for Medicaid?”

Common Long-Term Care Planning Misconceptions

Many people share common concerns as they reach retirement age: Will they have the ability to remain independent in their homes without intervention from others? Are they going to be able to maintain good health and receive adequate health care? Will they have enough money for everyday needs and not outlive their assets and income? Despite the fact that thousands of Americans are concerned with these aspects of aging, many have failed to develop adequate long-term care plans that specify which services they will need and how they will pay for them. Unfortunately, many Americans also share common misconceptions about long-term care planning that may be factors in why individuals fail to establish a properly executed long-term care plan prior to when they need the services. Continue reading “Common Long-Term Care Planning Misconceptions”

Chronic Medicaid vs. Community Medicaid

In New York, Community Medicaid helps cover the cost of home care and Chronic Medicaid pays for all or part of nursing home care. However, there are certain income and asset requirements that apply to these Medicaid programs because they are need based. Continue reading “Chronic Medicaid vs. Community Medicaid”