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Medicaid May Fund Your Long-Term Care

nursing home placement New YorkIn July 2017, Medicaid was ranked as the largest single payer for nursing home care throughout the country and was said to have provided one-third of nursing home care nationwide. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, one in three seniors turning 65 will eventually need nursing home care, and Medicaid is here to help fund that. Medicaid is the only public or private insurance program that will cover long-term nursing home care. Six out of ten nursing home residents are covered by Medicaid. Continue reading “Medicaid May Fund Your Long-Term Care”

Spending Down Assets for Medicaid: A Prepaid Funeral Contract

In order to be eligible for Medicaid, there are certain asset limits that need to be followed. Some of those include $2,000 in cash ($3,000 for a couple), a home valued at $500,000 or less, one automobile of any market value, funeral and burial funds, any real or personal property deemed essential for self-support, and a life insurance policy not exceeding $1,500. If an applicant wishes to receive Medicaid funding but has excessive assets, they will need to either spend down those assets or use the excessive amount to pay for long-term care needs until the surplus amount is drained. Continue reading “Spending Down Assets for Medicaid: A Prepaid Funeral Contract”

Common Medicaid Misconceptions

New York Medicaid eligibility assistanceMedicaid is a safety net that protects many elderly and aging parents. When healthcare becomes too expensive, and people can no longer afford it, Medicaid is there to help make those expenses less frightening. Many people only began hearing of Medicaid as a health insurance provider under Obamacare. Although Obamacare did help with expanding Medicaid coverage, Medicaid has been around for much longer. While there are many people who are currently covered by Medicaid, it can be a rather complicated and intimidating program to fully comprehend. Many applicants hear of misconceptions that may deter them from applying. These misconceptions are often inaccurate and must be addressed. Continue reading “Common Medicaid Misconceptions”

Spousal Medicaid

Long Island Medicaid application assistanceMedicaid law has provided special protections for those spouses who are healthy and wish to remain in the community while their husband or wife relocates to a long-term care facility. In 1988, Congress enacted provisions designed to ensure that the spouse who is still living at home will have enough income and resources to remain part of the community. These provisions have come to be known as spousal impoverishment provisions. Continue reading “Spousal Medicaid”

6 Warning Signs of Improper Care

careWhen our loved ones go into long-term care facilities, it can often be scary. There are many horror stories about elder abuse and neglectful care centers, and we hope that never happens to our family. It can sometimes be frustrating and disheartening to learn that your family member’s nursing home care falls short of expectations. Furthermore, unless you are there every minute of the day, it is frightening to leave them in the care of strangers.

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How to Apply for Medicaid

seniorWhen you apply for Medicaid coverage, a caseworker with review and assess whether you qualify for Medicaid benefits. Eligibility is need-based determinative, so it is important that you have evidence of your qualifications for the program. Make sure that before you apply, you have the necessary documents in hand.

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Medicaid Ineligibility Period

medicaidMedicaid is considered a need-based program. For this reason, in order to qualify for Medicaid, you must have only a limited income and a maximum amount of assets to qualify. Many people worry that because they have a home or a car that they will be ineligible to apply for Medicaid. This is untrue, as certain assets will be excluded from your total assets.

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Graham-Cassidy Proposal Puts Medicaid Coverage at Risk

Senate Republicans continue to push for legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. The Graham-Cassidy bill is sponsored by Senator Lindsey Graham, from South Carolina and Senator Bill Cassidy, from Louisiana. Although the bill is still lacking 50 votes needed, it is important to understand the effects it may have on health care. Continue reading “Graham-Cassidy Proposal Puts Medicaid Coverage at Risk”

Social Security Disability Insurance vs. Supplemental Security Income

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) are both supplemental income programs that are used to help the disabled, elderly, and blind. The main difference between SSDI and SSI is that SSI is a means-based program, whereas SSDI is an entitlement program. SSDI is only available to people who have worked long enough to accumulate work credits. SSI is available to people who have not earned enough work credits and can show that they financially need the support. Both SSI and SSDI are administered by the Social Security Administration, but they have entirely different financial requirements. Continue reading “Social Security Disability Insurance vs. Supplemental Security Income”

A Pooled Income Trust May Be The Best Option For Those With Excess Income

For an individual to be eligible for Medicaid services at home, he or she must be over 65 and disabled. In addition, the applicant must meet certain income and asset criteria in order to qualify, because Medicaid eligibility requires a means based test. As of 2017, an applicant is allowed to have $845.00 in income. It is possible that Medicaid may take any income in excess of this amount. For many individuals, turning over these excess funds to Medicaid is not a viable option because it would leave them without the means to pay certain expenses. Continue reading “A Pooled Income Trust May Be The Best Option For Those With Excess Income”