6 Warning Signs of Improper Care

careWhen our loved ones go into long-term care facilities, it can often be scary. There are many horror stories about elder abuse and neglectful care centers, and we hope that never happens to our family. It can sometimes be frustrating and disheartening to learn that your family member’s nursing home care falls short of expectations. Furthermore, unless you are there every minute of the day, it is frightening to leave them in the care of strangers.

Continue reading “6 Warning Signs of Improper Care”

Compensation Available for Family Members Acting as Caregivers

In the United States, the elderly population who require the assistance of a caregiver will grow substantially by 2018. In the future, the number of elderly persons may even begin to exceed the number of available caregivers. There have been efforts made throughout the United States to retain a dwindling number of caregivers who have been leaving the field. For many individuals who cannot afford a caregiver, the responsibility may fall on a family member or friend that is close to the elder. This responsibility can have physical, emotional and financial effects on the individual caring for their loved one. Continue reading “Compensation Available for Family Members Acting as Caregivers”

Medicare at a Glance

Medicare is a federal program, and as such the law in New York should be same the as in any other state. Medicaid is a federal state cooperative program, where each state can choose different benefits for its residents; as such, each state may have different benefit levels and requirements. Continue reading “Medicare at a Glance”

What is Managed Long-Term Care and What are My Available Options?

Managed long-term care is an option utilized by those who are disabled or chronically ill and need assistance with activities of daily living (ADL), but wish to remain within their homes and communities. Managed long-term care can be provided through the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) and managed long-term care plans.

PACE is a little-known Medicaid and Medicare program that provides comprehensive health care services to eligible members 55 years and older who are otherwise eligible to be admitted to a nursing home. PACE is available through 110 programs in the United States, eight of which are located in New York State.

According to AARP, PACE provides coverage of in-home care, checkups, doctor and dental services, hospital and nursing home stays, as well as prescription medication and some transportation. PACE is open to those enrolled in Medicaid and/or Medicare; some may need to pay a monthly premium based on coverage. All applicants are screened by a team of doctors, therapists and nurses who will determine whether an individual’s level of health and disability requires the level of care typically provided in a nursing home.

Managed long-term care plans provide long-term care services, such as home health care, nursing home care, ancillary and ambulatory services and are funded through Medicaid. Medicaid members can use their Medicaid and/or Medicare cards to pay for services rendered by their primary physicians. To be eligible for a managed long-term care plan, the individual must qualify for nursing home admission. Most enrollees must be 65 years or older to qualify for a managed long-term care plan; however, there are several plans in New York State that will accept younger applicants.

P&P Medicaid provides assistance to those who are seeking a home care program to meet their needs or the needs of their loved ones. We offer a comprehensive in-home assessment conducted by our case manager, who, with the assistance of a nurse, can help determine program eligibility. Together, the case manager, the client and their family caregivers can develop a comprehensive long-term care strategy that is reassessed on a regular basis.

For those seeking qualification for Medicaid, P&P Medicaid will handle the entire application and document acquiring process and appear on the applicant’s behalf for all interviews with the Department of Social Services (Medicaid). For more information about home care evaluation, Medicaid application or any of our other services, please call us at (516) 541-4770 for a consultation.

Geriatric Care Services Industry Projected to Exceed $1.1 Billion by 2023

As more baby boomers shift into retirement age, the emphasis on geriatric care services to meet the elder population’s growing needs becomes greater. According to a statement released by Global Market Insights, Inc., the geriatric care services market size is estimated to see revenues of $1,101,800,000 by 2023. The elder care industry reached $684 billion in 2015, and will steadily increase over the next couple of years due to the increase in the retirement-age population, in conjunction with growing disposable incomes.

The largest contributor in the geriatric care services market is Medicaid’s institutional care centers, which reached $279 billion in revenue in 2015. Medicaid is a federally funded program administered by the states that provides medical coverage and long-term care to middle-to low-income persons, including the disabled and the elderly.

Institutional care centers covered by Medicaid are residential facilities and around-the-clock, comprehensive elder care services. Medicaid coverage may include hospital and physician care, prescriptions, home care, nursing home care and other health-related expenses. Medicaid eligibility is based on income and resource restrictions and, although anyone may submit an application, an individual’s criteria must be reviewed and approved through the application process.

P&P Medicaid assists clients in the preparation of Medicaid applications for eligibility. Our company also provides a full range of geriatric care management services to help individuals and their families make decisions about and supervise their long-term care needs. Please contact P&P Medicaid Consulting, Inc. at (516) 541-4770 for more information.

The American Geriatrics Society Focuses on the Future of Elder Care

With an estimated 20 percent of the United States population accounting for those 65 and older by 2030, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) is focusing on how to improve medical care in the geriatric community. One concern is the low number of doctors specializing in geriatric care. U.S. News and World Report-Health estimates that approximately 17,000 geriatricians are necessary to care for the growing elderly population, but that there is currently only about 7,500 or more certified in America.

One goal of AGC is to find additional funding to support medical students studying to be a geriatrician. One of the reasons why many graduating medical students choose other medical specialties is that private insurance has higher payouts. When it comes to Medicare and Medicaid, the reimbursement rates are lower. With high debt upon graduation, going into geriatrics may not be an option for new doctors. With more educational funding, the number of doctors entering the geriatric field is apt to increase.

Additionally, there is a focus on other skilled professional fields which care for the elderly. This includes occupational therapists, physical therapists, nurses, social workers, and home health care aids. Often these health care providers must work together to support an elderly individual who suffers from multiple chronic issues. With the elderly, often a more holistic approach is better because much of the medical care will focus on daily functionality, such as getting dressed and eating.

Understanding the options for an elderly loved one can be challenging. Applying for Medicaid and making sure necessary needs are covered can be a complex process. P&P Medicaid provides Medicaid application services. The company also provides a full range of geriatric care management services to help individuals and their families make decisions about and supervise their long-term care needs.  Please contact P&P Medicaid Consulting, Inc. at (516) 541-4770 for more information.

How New York Residents Can Choose a Long-Term Care Plan for Loved Ones

In caring for an elderly loved one, it can be challenging to choose whether an outside long-term care option is best, or to offer care from within the home. Often, financial burdens and how much Medicaid will cover becomes a main consideration. Medicaid can cover both nursing homes and home and community-based services. Planning ahead and knowing what factors to weigh when choosing a long-term care plan is vital to reduce the stress on your loved one as they start requiring more assistance.

First, it is important to compare what Medicaid will cover for both home-based care services and institutional services. Medicaid offices, which are state run, set out eligibility for specific benefits. Professional agencies can assist you in understanding your various options.

After narrowing down available options, if it is best for your loved one to enter long-term care at a nursing home facility, there are resources to help you find the best location. To research the quality of life at a nursing home, you can contact the New York State Department of Health. This is the agency which investigates complaints and oversees health and safety standards in nursing homes participating in Medicaid.

Once you have compared the quality of the nursing homes in a given area, it is important to visit them and make sure they meet the care needs you are searching for. Comparing each home’s policy, such as visiting hours, how the staff treats the patients, and types of activities available, are all important in choosing the right facility.

Instead of a nursing home facility, you may choose to care for your loved one at home. This may require modification to the home, such as handicapped bathrooms and ramps. Hiring nurses and therapy aids may also be necessary, unless community adult day care is a better option. Medicare may not cover all of the necessary costs for home health care, so it is important to research all alternatives. Another alternative is to have an assisted living facility care for your loved one. However, Medicaid does cover this type of care.

Understanding the options for long-term care for an elderly loved one can be challenging. Applying for Medicaid and making sure necessary needs are covered can be a complex process. P&P Medicaid provides Medicaid application services. The company also provides a full range of geriatric care management services to help individuals and their families make decisions about and supervise their long-term care needs.  Please contact P&P Medicaid Consulting, Inc. at (516) 541-4770 for more information.

The Financial Burden of Elderly Care on Long Island’s Middle Class

As Long Island’s baby boomers reach retirement age, there is an influx of adults who require long-term care and Social Security benefits. As it stands, two-thirds of Americans age 65 and over will soon fall into this category. This trend was not unexpected, but perhaps unprepared for. With limited funds supplied by Social Security and private or Medicaid insurance, the burden falls to younger family members, who, buried by inflation and the slow-moving economy, are often already struggling to make ends meet.

In the last 10 years, the cost of long-term care has risen dramatically.  According to a report by insurer Genworth Financial, the median bill for an assisted living facility is nearly $50,000 a year and for a semi-private room in a nursing home, it’s now over $100,000 a year. To lend perspective to these figures, the median household earns $52,000 in the U.S.

It’s not easy to see a parent or loved one’s health care needs rise, and even more uncomfortable to face the financial realities associated with that care. Many people turn to Medicaid to relieve some of the cost, but it is oftentimes difficult to secure the coverage necessary to support their aging loved ones. This phenomenon is particularly felt among the middle class, who feel they are left without any viable options.

More and more people rely on home healthcare for more extended periods of time. The option to hire in-home aides, although primarily out of pocket, is promising, since the cost is much lower than it is in institutionalized facilities such as nursing homes. Yet at a rate of $20 per hour (a conservative estimate), the cost of just eight hours a day of home health support tallies to $58,240 a year — an unaffordable price tag for 50 percent of American households. Round-the-clock in-home care at the same rate would come in at $174,720 per year, which only wealthier families could even consider.

If you’re unsure about the right kind of care for a loved one, or have questions about how to afford their care, contact elder care professionals at P&P Medicaid. In addition to assisting with Medicaid applications on behalf of clients, our company also provides a full range of geriatric care management services to help individuals and their families make decisions about and supervise their long-term care needs.  Please contact P&P Medicaid Consulting, Inc. at (516) 541-4770 for more information.

Half the World’s Elder Population Lacks Long-Term Services

Most will agree with the statement that all people should have equal access to physicians, hospitals, and medical tests in their communities. Yet despite the world’s recognition of health care as a fundamental necessity, not everyone receives proper healthcare.

Recently, The International Labor Organization released findings that more than half of all people 65 and older in the world have no long-term health care. The 46 countries studied account for 80 percent of the world’s population of older people. The study brought to light the lack of protection for elderly people as well as a lack of industry caregivers.

According to the study, more than 300 million older adults require higher-level care and cannot access professional health services when needed. Despite the growing international demand for elderly long-term care, the report revealed that most countries are neglecting to meet their population’s needs with lack of funding and services.

The United States is no exception. The Commonwealth Fund reported that, out of 11 counties surveyed, the American Healthcare system ranked last in comparison. One of the most prevalent concerns revealed by the study was that that Americans over the age of 65 reported that high cost was the main reason they had skipped medical care or treatment. This finding is significant because Medicare is often thought of as free, universal health coverage for elderly Americans. Medicare, which is available to anyone over the age of 65 or to the certified disabled who have worked and paid into the Social Security system, differs from Medicaid.

Medicaid is a federally funded program run by states and local government, which provides medical insurance and long-term care for middle-to low-income persons, including the elderly and disabled. If one is eligible, based on income and resource restrictions, Medicaid will pay for all medical care (including doctors and hospitals), prescriptions, home care, nursing home care and other health care-related expenses. Medicaid is based on income and resource levels, and although anyone can apply, eligibility needs to be approved via an application process.

Many Americans who are eligible for Medicaid are unaware that these services are available to them or do not know how to begin the application process. P&P Medicaid is committed to helping people through this application and document-acquiring process and will appear on your behalf at all interviews with the Department of Social Services (Medicaid). P&P Medicaid utilizes its industry expertise and experience to expedite your application and to maximize the opportunity for success.

For further questions or to speak to a P&P Medicaid representative about Medicaid qualification call (516) 541-4770 or contact us by email.

Why Do I Need a Geriatric Care Manager?

Geriatric care managers are social workers, psychologists, gerontologists and nurses who specialize in senior care issues. They are trained to assess, plan, coordinate, monitor and provide services for the elderly and their families. They offer necessary hands-on guidance and services, while allowing family members to provide quality time and emotional support that would otherwise be limited if the family was the sole caregiver.

Geriatric care managers take into consideration a client’s mental and physical health, financial resources and personal preferences. They are a knowledgeable guide that determines a senior’s needs and provides a personalized type, level and source of housing and care best-suited to help meet those needs. While transitions in care and housing can often be difficult and overwhelming for the elderly, the geriatric care managers oversee the situation and work to relieve the hurt feelings and anger that come with losing independence.

Families should consider hiring a geriatric care manager when the senior reaches a point of transition. This can be anything from hiring a home care worker, moving the senior into or between senior living options, and even during a hospital stay to prepare for the patient’s discharge.

There are many reasons to consider hiring a geriatric care provider, as when a loved one develops a loss of function, whether physically or mentally, for which the patient will require assistance. One may seek out additional assistance for when an older family member reaches a need for a higher level of caregiving or there is uncertainty regarding a senior’s living arrangement or health needs. If a senior is not functioning at his or her best, or is thought to be at risk in the current living situation, a geriatric care manager can step in to address the concerns of the senior and their family.